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"Phebe Massey" silk dress c.1770      Made, like the original, in chestnut brown silk. Entirely hand sewn, with a slight exception; after cutting the silk, I machine-overcast the edges of the six 22" wide panels that make the dress & skirt, (as the original had) so that the fabric wouldn't fray during handling and making up.

"Phebe Massey" silk dress c.1770 Made, like the original, in chestnut brown silk. Entirely hand sewn, with a slight exception; after cutting the silk, I machine-overcast the edges of the six 22" wide panels that make the dress & skirt, (as the original had) so that the fabric wouldn't fray during handling and making up.

Found on fragonard.com

Found on fragonard.com - marieantoinettesplayhouse

Growth and Change in the Colonies

-The pockets were usually horizontal, placed low down and covered with .

The Nanny

Young ladies in training, preparing to serve the noble families. One girl undergoes the most rigorous training for she is going to the princess. Who, the girl finds out, is anything but a lady.

Standard outfit for a yeoman class woman in the 1620s, i.e. a Pilgrim coming to Plymouth.

During this time period the Puritan women would dress like this. Most clothing was made by the women by hand. Their style was very simple and the colors of the clothing were mainly black,white,and brown.

This is a half-scale dress I made based on a pattern from Janet Arnold and a painting of a member of the Russian Czars' family.  It is made of a yellow silk file and white lace.  It was made for a show of Half-scale clothing I did in Macon, Mo and it includes all of the foundation and support garments (corset, collapsable bustle, 2 petticoats and a chemise.  The entire piece stands less than 3 feet tall. Designed, patterned, cut and sewn by Costume Designer Jack A. Smith

This is a half-scale dress I made based on a pattern from Janet Arnold and a painting of a member of the Russian Czars' family. It is made of a yellow silk file and white lace. It was made for a show of Half-scale clothing I did in Macon, Mo and it includes all of the foundation and support garments (corset, collapsable bustle, 2 petticoats and a chemise. The entire piece stands less than 3 feet tall. Designed, patterned, cut and sewn by Costume Designer Jack A. Smith

Quaker Round Gown c.1775 Robe a l’anglaise round gown (back cut en fourreau), reproduction of extant dress of Phoebe Massey, c. 1775, at the Massey House., Broomall PA. Like the original, it is made in brown silk with a linen-lined bodice and sleeves; entirely hand-sewn and constructed from a pattern taken directly from the original garment. Mitts, white linen with blue silk embroidery, reproduction of extant item in the costume collection of Colonial Williamsburg (accession #1985-216.1).

Quaker Round Gown c.1775 Robe a l’anglaise round gown (back cut en fourreau), reproduction of extant dress of Phoebe Massey, c. 1775, at the Massey House., Broomall PA. Like the original, it is made in brown silk with a linen-lined bodice and sleeves; entirely hand-sewn and constructed from a pattern taken directly from the original garment. Mitts, white linen with blue silk embroidery, reproduction of extant item in the costume collection of Colonial Williamsburg (accession #1985-216.1).

Ensemble  --  18th Century  --  Silk  --  Likely Austrian  --  The Costume Institute at The Metropolitan Museum of Art

"Date: century Culture: Austrian (probably) Medium: silk"Date: century Culture: probably Austrian Medium: silk Dimensions: [no dimensions available] Credit Line: Gift of Mr.

The London Quaker. A woodcut print of a woman, entitled 'The London Quaker'. It is from 'The Cryes of the City of London' numbered 45, published by Robert Sayer, c.1760. MoL 003250

A young quaker girl standing with hands clasped at waist, a cloak in her right arm and wearing plain clothes with frilled sleeves and a scarf over her hair; from bound series of the Cries of London. 1688 Etching and engraving

Robe a la française, England, silk plain weave (faille) with silk and metallic-thread supplementary-weft patterning, trimmed with metallic lace, c. 1765.

LACMA Collections Online Woman’s Robe a la Française, circa 1765 Silk plain weave (faille) with silk and metallic-thread supplementary-weft patterning, and metallic lace, Petticoat center back length: 35 in. Robe center back length: 54 in.

Early 19th century, America - Quaker's dress - Silk taffeta, cotton lining, and silk tape

A Quaker's dress of greenish-brown taffeta American, Early century USA Dimensions x 73 cm x 28 in.) Measured flat for hanging storage Medium or Technique Silk taffeta, cotton lining, and silk tape Classification Costumes Accession Number

New York, NY - Museum at the Fashion Institute of Technology is a must-visit for the fashion-obsessed. At any given time, there are at least 100 objects from the Museum's collections on view to the public in the galleries.

Women's dress- includes an under petticoat, stays (corset), stomacher, and hoop skirt.

http://www.andrewkahn.me/manifesto//history/17thcent/mensfashionplates/multiple17.jpg

Plates from McClellan's History of American Costume illustrated by Sophy Steele, The two figures on the left represent an English Quaker Couple of the figures at right are a French Hugenot couple of 1686

Replica gown - 1775 "Phebe Massey" dress - re-created by me from an extant dress in Broomall, PA.  Completely hand-sewn; chestnut brown silk; apron-front style skirt; 3/4 shaped sleeves; unusual 1-inch  'growth tuck' at hemline (usually only done on children's garments). Lined with antique linen. Exact pattern taken from original garment.

Replica gown - 1775 "Phebe Massey" dress - re-created by me from an extant dress in Broomall, PA. Completely hand-sewn; chestnut brown silk; apron-front style skirt; 3/4 shaped sleeves; unusual 1-inch 'growth tuck' at hemline (usually only done on children's garments). Lined with antique linen. Exact pattern taken from original garment.

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