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The synagogue, dated to the 2nd Temple period (50BC - 100AD) is one of the oldest ever found, and was unearthed at Migdal, which Christians believe to be the birthplace of Mary Magdalene, a leading follower of Jesus. Archaeologists were particularly excited by the discovery of the stone depicting the menorah -- a seven-branched candelabrum -- from the Jewish Second Temple which was destroyed in 70 AD during the Roman siege of Jerusalem.

Recent Archaeological Finds In The Holy Land

The archeological discovery from 2009 was found at the site of the Migdal area in the Sea of Galilee where this stone with a seven branch Menorah belongs to the Second Temple Area, around the year 100 BCE.

The oldest surviving manuscript of the Lord's Prayer, with fragments from the Gospels of Luke and John. Written in Egypt in Alexandrian-style text.  It was donated to the Vatican Library in March 2007.

'The Bodmer Papyrus' (Millennium Gate Museum, Atlanta, GA) * The oldest surviving manuscript of the Lord's Prayer, with fragments from the Gospels of Luke and John. Written in Egypt in Alexandrian-style text. It was donated to the Vatican Library in March

Samson eliminated the Philistine leadership. Could one man pull down an entire temple? Archaeologists uncovered two Philistine temples: Tel Qasile, in northern Tel Aviv, and one in Tel Miqne, ancient Ekron, 21 miles south of Tel Aviv. Both share a unique design; two central pillars supported the roof and the pillars were made of wood and rested on stone bases. With the pillars being about six feet apart, a strong man could dislodge them from their stone bases and bring down the structure.

The two stone pillar bases in the Philistine Temple at Tel Qasile. This archaeological findings match the Biblical story perfectly and attest to the plausibility of the account of Judges

Tumba del Profeta Zacarías en el Valle de Cedrón, Jerusalén, ISRAEL.

The tomb of the prophet Zechariah, is the old stone monument, carved in the rock-solid, and has a burial chamber before is the bottom of the Mount of Olives, in Jerusalem - Palestine.

Utnapishtim According to one version of the Mesopotamian flood myth, Utnapishtim was the wise man who alone survived the great flood that was sent to eradicate humanity. The gods Anu, Enlil, Ninurta and Ennugi decided to destroy humankind, having grown tired of their ways. Oh, those humans, with their ways! However, Ea, the water god, warned Utnapishtim of the conspiracy, and told him to build a great boat, and in it store the seeds of all life. He did it, and loaded it with the said seeds…

Sumerian Utnapishtim - from the Sumerian flood myth. The biblical Noah is an analog of Utnapishtim, though the Sumerian deluge story was written long before the Noah of the Torah.

The synagogue, dated to the 2nd Temple period (50BC - 100AD) is one of the oldest ever found, and was unearthed at Migdal, Israel. Archaeologists were particularly excited by the discovery of a large carved stone depicting the menorah -- a seven-branched candelabrum -- from the  Second Temple which was destroyed in 70 AD during the Roman siege of Jerusalem.

Recent Archaeological Finds In The Holy Land

The synagogue, dated to the Temple period - is one of the oldest ever found, and was unearthed at Migdal, Israel. Archaeologists were particularly excited by the discovery of a large carved stone depicting the menorah -- a seven-branched

The Archaeology News Network: Archaeologists uncover ancient cistern in Jerusalem

First Temple Period Water Resevoir Discovered in Jerusalem. This is a large rock-hewn water reservoir discovered in Jerusalem (The Israel Antiquities Authority)

Israeli archaeologists have uncovered an 1800-year-old bathing pool used by the Roman Tenth Legion and dating from the second and third centuries AD in the old Jewish Quarter of Jerusalem known by the Romans as Aelia Capitolina.

*JERUSALEM ~ Israeli archaeologists have uncovered an bathing pool used by the Roman Tenth Legion and dating from the second and third centuries AD in the old Jewish Quarter of Jerusalem known by the Romans as Aelia Capitolina.

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