Get willow branches from landscape nursery in bundles of 100 sticks. Put branches in ground at least 6 inches, and 4 to 8 inches apart (one pointing left, the next pointing right). Then weave them together. Using hemp twine, tie them together at the top.

willow branches from landscape nursery in bundles of 100 sticks . put branches in ground at least 6 inches . 4 to 8 inches apart . one pointing left . the next pointing right . weave them together . using hemp twine tie them together at the top

Live willow fence

Pleaching was common in gardens from the late Middle Ages until the C. - weaving branches of deciduous trees to form a living fence. Sometimes branches woven together grow together, a natural grafting known as inosculation

Building a Living Fence. I want to do this so bad. I have yet to have good luck with my berry plants out here, but no problem growing siberian elms. So I wonder if those will make a great fence too.

Homesteading and Livestock

Building a Living Fence: Osage orange trees (Maclura pomifera), also called hedge apple or horse apple. For an incredibly tough, enduring windbreak that’s a major player in a local ecology, probably nothing surpasses Osage orange.

Living Fences

favorite garden element: espalier trees...

Espalier is a horticultural technique of pruning and grafting used together to train trees to create two-dimensional forms with the branches. This technique was originally developed during the Middle Ages as a way to grow fruit trees within castle walls

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