Alexander Grafov
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Grumman XP-50 (1941) was a land-based development of the shipboard XF5F-1 Skyrocket fighter, entered into a USAAC contest for a twin-engine heavy interceptor aircraft. The Army Air Corps placed an order for a prototype on 25 November 1939 designating it XP-50, but it lost the competition to the Lockheed XP-49.

Grumman XP-50 (1941) was a land-based development of the shipboard XF5F-1 Skyrocket fighter, entered into a USAAC contest for a twin-engine heavy interceptor aircraft. The Army Air Corps placed an order for a prototype on 25 November 1939 designating it XP-50, but it lost the competition to the Lockheed XP-49.

grumman skyrocket | Grumman XF5F Skyrocket | diseno-art.com

grumman skyrocket | Grumman XF5F Skyrocket | diseno-art.com

Grumman XP-50 | This was to be the Air Force version of the F5F

Grumman XP-50 | This was to be the Air Force version of the F5F

Grumman XF5F-1 Skyrocket, twin-eng. shipboard fighter,1940.

Grumman XF5F-1 Skyrocket, twin-eng. shipboard fighter,1940.

Phoenix yc14b 2011 - Boeing YC-14 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Phoenix yc14b 2011 - Boeing YC-14 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Bell X-5 gave NACA and Air Force researchers a chance to test out variable-sweep wings. In this case, the sweep of the wings could be shifted--in flight, no less--between 20 degrees and 60 degrees. The more swept-back the wing angle, the less the drag and the better for flight approaching supersonic speed. The powered transition took about 20 seconds, and, if needed, the pilot could hand-crank the wings into the more forward position (more perpendicular to the fuselage) for landing.

The Bell X-5 gave NACA and Air Force researchers a chance to test out variable-sweep wings. In this case, the sweep of the wings could be shifted--in flight, no less--between 20 degrees and 60 degrees. The more swept-back the wing angle, the less the drag and the better for flight approaching supersonic speed. The powered transition took about 20 seconds, and, if needed, the pilot could hand-crank the wings into the more forward position (more perpendicular to the fuselage) for landing.

Northrop P530 Cobra mockup - one concept in a long chain of evolution between F-5 and F-18

Northrop P530 Cobra mockup - one concept in a long chain of evolution between F-5 and F-18

The Hunting H.126 (1963) was a British experimental aircraft designed and built by Hunting Aircraft in order to test the concept of blown flaps, or as they were known in Britain, "jet flaps". Only one aircraft was built, being flown in a series of one hundred test flights at the Royal Aircraft Establishment's Aerodynamics Flight at RAE Bedford. First flight 26 March 1963

The Hunting H.126 (1963) was a British experimental aircraft designed and built by Hunting Aircraft in order to test the concept of blown flaps, or as they were known in Britain, "jet flaps". Only one aircraft was built, being flown in a series of one hundred test flights at the Royal Aircraft Establishment's Aerodynamics Flight at RAE Bedford. First flight 26 March 1963

close up of Boeing YC-14

close up of Boeing YC-14

Boeing YC-14A aircraft picture

Boeing YC-14A aircraft picture